The best 10 cameras in comparison

Which are the best cameras of 2020?

Best cameras of 2020 (1 - 5)
camera comparison
Comparison winner
camera comparison
Comparison winner
Nikon D850 + Nikon AF-S Nikkor 24-120mm f/4G ED VR
Comparison winner
Canon EOS 5D Mark IV + Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM
Comparison winner
Sony Alpha 7R III + Sony FE 24-70mm f/4 ZA OSS Vario-Tessar T*
Comparison winner
Sony Alpha a9 + Sony FE 24-70mm F2.8 GM
Comparison winner
Pentax K-1 Mark II + Pentax D FA 28-105mm HD f/3.5-5.6 ED DC WR
Comparison winner
Canon EOS 5D Mark IV + Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM
Comparison winner
Pentax K-1 + Pentax D FA 24-70mm HD f/2.8 ED SDM WR
Comparison winner
Sony Alpha a6500 + Sony Vario-Tessar E 16-70mm f/4 ZA OSS T*
Comparison winner
Sony Alpha a7 III + Sony FE 28-70mm f/3.5-5.6 OSS
Comparison winner
Sony a6600 + Sony E 18-135mm F3.5-5.6 OSS
Image
Nikon D850 + Nikon AF-S Nikkor 24-120mm f/4G ED VR
100points
Canon EOS 5D Mark IV + Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM
97points
Sony Alpha 7R III + Sony FE 24-70mm f/4 ZA OSS Vario-Tessar T*
95points
Sony Alpha a9 + Sony FE 24-70mm F2.8 GM
95points
Pentax K-1 Mark II + Pentax D FA 28-105mm HD f/3.5-5.6 ED DC WR
94points
Canon EOS 5D Mark IV + Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM
93points
Pentax K-1 + Pentax D FA 24-70mm HD f/2.8 ED SDM WR
93points
Sony Alpha a6500 + Sony Vario-Tessar E 16-70mm f/4 ZA OSS T*
92points
Sony Alpha a7 III + Sony FE 28-70mm f/3.5-5.6 OSS
92points
Sony a6600 + Sony E 18-135mm F3.5-5.6 OSS
92points
Best price
Best price
Summary
Summary
  • Design (100)
  • Optics (97)
  • Videography (86)
  • Audio (73)
  • Battery (78)
  • Features (79)
  • Design (86)
  • Optics (100)
  • Videography (71)
  • Audio (52)
  • Battery (73)
  • Features (95)
  • Design (83)
  • Optics (91)
  • Videography (86)
  • Audio (94)
  • Battery (73)
  • Features (83)
  • Design (93)
  • Optics (96)
  • Videography (90)
  • Audio (73)
  • Battery (94)
  • Features (80)
  • Design (79)
  • Optics (94)
  • Videography (79)
  • Audio (83)
  • Battery (71)
  • Features (92)
  • Design (76)
  • Optics (92)
  • Videography (71)
  • Audio (52)
  • Battery (73)
  • Features (100)
  • Design (77)
  • Optics (94)
  • Videography (67)
  • Audio (83)
  • Battery (72)
  • Features (92)
  • Design (93)
  • Optics (92)
  • Videography (86)
  • Audio (63)
  • Battery (66)
  • Features (70)
  • Design (74)
  • Optics (86)
  • Videography (90)
  • Audio (83)
  • Battery (73)
  • Features (96)
  • Design (84)
  • Optics (93)
  • Videography (90)
  • Audio (83)
  • Battery (74)
  • Features (77)
Pros
Pros
  • Better image quality
  • Longer battery life
  • Better color depth
  • Greater zoom range
  • Wider dynamic range
  • Built-in focus motor
  • Larger sensor
  • Longer battery life
  • Greater zoom range
  • Better image quality
  • Lower noise at high ISO
  • Better color depth
  • Wider dynamic range
  • More battery power
  • Stereo speakers
  • Better image quality
  • Lower noise at high ISO
  • More focus points
  • Wider aperture at minimum focal length
  • More battery power
  • Built-in focus motor
  • Better image quality
  • Better color depth
  • Greater zoom range
  • Built-in focus motor
  • Wider aperture at minimum focal length
  • Larger sensor
  • Longer battery life
  • Better image quality
  • Wider aperture at minimum focal length
  • Longer battery life
  • Better color depth
  • Built-in focus motor
  • Built-in focus motor
  • Phase detection autofocus (PDAF) for videos
  • Better image quality
  • Lower noise at high ISO
  • More focus points
  • Wider dynamic range
  • More battery power
  • Phase detection autofocus (PDAF) for videos
  • Longer battery life
  • Greater zoom range
  • More battery power
  • Phase detection autofocus (PDAF) for videos
  • Dustproof and water-resistant
Cons
Cons
  • Wide aperture (main camera)
  • Noise
  • Focus points
  • Number of microphones
  • Sensor size
  • Wide aperture (main camera)
  • Battery power
  • Color depth
  • Dynamic range
  • Noise
  • Flip-out screen
  • Wide aperture (main camera)
  • Optical zoom
  • Number of microphones
  • Battery life (CIPA)
  • Optical zoom
  • Color depth
  • Dynamic range
  • Number of microphones
  • Sensor size
  • Battery life (CIPA)
  • Battery power
  • Focus points
  • Video recording (main camera)
  • Optical zoom
  • Battery power
  • Color depth
  • Dynamic range
  • Noise
  • Flip-out screen
  • Battery power
  • Focus points
  • Wide aperture (main camera)
  • Optical zoom
  • 3.5mm audio jack
  • Noise
  • Color depth
  • Dynamic range
  • Optical zoom
  • Flip-out screen
  • Sensor size
  • Battery life (CIPA)
  • Sensor size
Design
Built-in focus motorThe focus motor moves the lens in order to autofocus. For system cameras, having a focus motor in the camera's body allows you to use a wide range of lenses, including lenses which do not have their own focus motor. For compact cameras, a focus motor is usually built-in.
Built-in focus motorThe focus motor moves the lens in order to autofocus. For system cameras, having a focus motor in the camera's body allows you to use a wide range of lenses, including lenses which do not have their own focus motor. For compact cameras, a focus motor is usually built-in.
Flip-out screenFlip-out screens can be useful for tricky shots.
Flip-out screenFlip-out screens can be useful for tricky shots.
Dustproof and water-resistantThe device is dustproof and water-resistant. Water-resistant devices can resist the penetration of water, such as powerful water jets, but not being submerged into water.
Dustproof and water-resistantThe device is dustproof and water-resistant. Water-resistant devices can resist the penetration of water, such as powerful water jets, but not being submerged into water.
More viewfinder coverageWith 100% coverage you can compose the image correctly when you capture the photo. With less than full coverage you may have to crop your photos afterwards to get them looking perfect.
More viewfinder coverageWith 100% coverage you can compose the image correctly when you capture the photo. With less than full coverage you may have to crop your photos afterwards to get them looking perfect.100%100%100%100%100%100%100%100%100%100%
Weather-sealed (splashproof)The device is protected with extra seals to prevent failures caused by dust, raindrops, and water splashes.
Weather-sealed (splashproof)The device is protected with extra seals to prevent failures caused by dust, raindrops, and water splashes.
Total score for "Design"
Total score for "Design"
Optics
AF trackingWith AF tracking, once you choose the subject and press the shutter release part way down, as the subject moves, the autofocus will follow it. No more out of focus shots.
AF trackingWith AF tracking, once you choose the subject and press the shutter release part way down, as the subject moves, the autofocus will follow it. No more out of focus shots.
Focus pointsThe more focus points the more flexibility in picking which part of the scene to focus on. They also give the image sensor a better probability in identifying the right area of the scene to focus on in more automatic modes.
Focus pointsThe more focus points the more flexibility in picking which part of the scene to focus on. They also give the image sensor a better probability in identifying the right area of the scene to focus on in more automatic modes.15361425693336133425693425
Optical zoomThe zoom range is the ratio between the longest and shortest focal lengths. A higher zoom range means that the lens is more versatile.
Optical zoomThe zoom range is the ratio between the longest and shortest focal lengths. A higher zoom range means that the lens is more versatile.5x4.37x2.9x2x3.7x1x3x0.23x2.5x7.5x
Sensor sizeThe larger the sensor the more light the sensor captures yielding in better image quality.
Sensor sizeThe larger the sensor the more light the sensor captures yielding in better image quality.35.9 x 23.9mm36 x 24mm24 x 35.9mm35.6 x 23.8mm35.9 x 24mm36 x 24mm35.9 x 24mm23.5 x 15.6mm35.8 x 23.8mm23.5 x 15.6mm
Wide aperture (main camera)With a wider aperture the sensor can capture more light, helping to avoid blur by enabling a faster shutter speed. It also provides a shallow depth of field, allowing you to blur the background to focus attention on the subject.
Wide aperture (main camera)With a wider aperture the sensor can capture more light, helping to avoid blur by enabling a faster shutter speed. It also provides a shallow depth of field, allowing you to blur the background to focus attention on the subject.f/4.00 f/4.00 f/4.00 f/2.80 f/3.50 f/1.40 f/2.80 f/4.00 f/3.50 f/3.50
Total score for "Optics"
Total score for "Optics"
Videography
Video recording (main camera)The maximum resolution available for videos shot with the main camera. Although it may be possible to choose among other frame rates, those recordings usually have lower resolutions.
Video recording (main camera)The maximum resolution available for videos shot with the main camera. Although it may be possible to choose among other frame rates, those recordings usually have lower resolutions.2160 x 30fps2160 x 30fps2160 x 30fps2160 x 30fps1080 x 30fps2160 x 30fps1080 x 60fps2160 x 30fps2160 x 30fps2160 x 30fps
24p cinema mode24p is a video format (24 frames per second) traditionally used in cinema. Nowadays, it is used to create film-like motion characteristics.
24p cinema mode24p is a video format (24 frames per second) traditionally used in cinema. Nowadays, it is used to create film-like motion characteristics.
Phase detection autofocus (PDAF) for videosA phase detection autofocus system is faster than a contrast detection autofocus system. Even when recording scenes with a lot of fast movements, the videos are sharp and clear.
Phase detection autofocus (PDAF) for videosA phase detection autofocus system is faster than a contrast detection autofocus system. Even when recording scenes with a lot of fast movements, the videos are sharp and clear.
Continuous autofocus for moviesWhen recording movies they stay focussed and sharp.
Continuous autofocus for moviesWhen recording movies they stay focussed and sharp.
Timelapse videoA timelapse shows a long passage of time sped up. A series of photographs taken from the same position over a long period is joined together to create a short video. It is great way to capture things like the setting sun, or clouds moving across the sky.
Timelapse videoA timelapse shows a long passage of time sped up. A series of photographs taken from the same position over a long period is joined together to create a short video. It is great way to capture things like the setting sun, or clouds moving across the sky.
Total score for "Videography"
Total score for "Videography"
Audio
Stereo microphoneA stereo microphone allows to record audio files or movies in stereo without an external microphone.
Stereo microphoneA stereo microphone allows to record audio files or movies in stereo without an external microphone.
Stereo speakersDevices with stereo speakers deliver sound from independent channels on both left and right sides, creating a richer sound and a better experience.
Stereo speakersDevices with stereo speakers deliver sound from independent channels on both left and right sides, creating a richer sound and a better experience.
Microphone inputA microphone port allows connecting external high-end or specialized microphones.
Microphone inputA microphone port allows connecting external high-end or specialized microphones.
Number of microphonesMore microphones result in better sound quality and enable the device to filter out background noise.
Number of microphonesMore microphones result in better sound quality and enable the device to filter out background noise.1111212222
3.5mm audio jackWith a standard mini jack socket, you can use the device with most headphones.
3.5mm audio jackWith a standard mini jack socket, you can use the device with most headphones.
Total score for "Audio"
Total score for "Audio"
Battery
Rechargeable batteryThe battery can be recharged and used over again.
Rechargeable batteryThe battery can be recharged and used over again.
Battery level indicatorAn indicator shows you when the device has low battery.
Battery level indicatorAn indicator shows you when the device has low battery.
Removable batteryThe battery is removable and can be replaced by the user if broken.
Removable batteryThe battery is removable and can be replaced by the user if broken.
Battery power
Battery power2100mAh2000mAh2280mAh2280mAh1860mAh2000mAh1860mAh1100mAh2280mAh2280mAh
Battery life (CIPA)CIPA is an independent, standard measurement that determines how many shots a camera can take before the battery dies.
Battery life (CIPA)CIPA is an independent, standard measurement that determines how many shots a camera can take before the battery dies.1840shots900shots650shots650shots670shots900shots760shots350shots610shots810shots
Total score for "Battery"
Total score for "Battery"
Features
Color depthThe better a device's color depth the more color nuances it can distinguish. Source: DxOMark.
Color depthThe better a device's color depth the more color nuances it can distinguish. Source: DxOMark.26.4bits24.8bits26bits24.9bits25.4bits24.8bits25.4bits24.5bits25bitsN.A.
Dynamic rangeThe better the dynamic range the system captures a wider number of values from dark to light leading to more details in low and highlights. Source: DxOMark.
Dynamic rangeThe better the dynamic range the system captures a wider number of values from dark to light leading to more details in low and highlights. Source: DxOMark.14.8Evs13.6Evs14.7Evs13.3Evs14.6Evs13.6Evs14.6Evs13.7Evs14.7EvsN.A.
External memory slotThe device has a standard memory slot (such as an SD or micro SD card slot) so that you can either extend the internal storage with affordable memory modules or you can retrieve data, such as photographs, easily from a memory card.
External memory slotThe device has a standard memory slot (such as an SD or micro SD card slot) so that you can either extend the internal storage with affordable memory modules or you can retrieve data, such as photographs, easily from a memory card.
Image qualityA device's overall image quality score considers: color depth, dynamic range and low light performance. Source: DxOMark.
Image qualityA device's overall image quality score considers: color depth, dynamic range and low light performance. Source: DxOMark.10091100929691968596N.A.
NoiseThe maximum ISO at which the device still captures excellent quality images. Source: DxOMark.
NoiseThe maximum ISO at which the device still captures excellent quality images. Source: DxOMark.2660 ISO2995 ISO3523 ISO3517 ISO3280 ISO2995 ISO3280 ISO1405 ISO3730 ISON.A.
Total score for "Features"
Total score for "Features"

How to choose the right camera for your needs

A digital camera is a significant investment. Since the release of the first digital camera available to consumers in 1990, digital photography has advanced at an incredible speed. When choosing a camera, it's no longer just a Canon vs. Nikon dilemma. Each manufacturer offers many different types of cameras, and it's hard to choose among the best DSLRs, point-and-shoot cameras, or mirrorless cameras. With a wide array of options in the market, it's essential to take your goals and camera specifications into careful consideration to make the right choice. If you're looking for the best camera to fit your needs, you came to the right place.

What type of camera do you need?

The first thing you should figure out is what type of camera fits your needs. A smartphone's camera might be enough for casual photographers, but a dedicated camera delivers better image quality. There are three basic camera categories: DSLR (digital single-lens reflex), mirrorless, and point-and-shoot. All three types vary in size, features, and purpose.

If you're a first-time buyer who needs an easy-to-use camera to document personal activities for keepsakes and sharing on social media, a point-and-shoot camera is the best choice for you. It's straightforward to use, and it comes with several pre-sets, so you won't have to fumble with manually adjusting each frame before taking a photo; some cameras even come with built-in features like smile or face detection. Most point-and-shoot cameras are compact and lightweight, ideal to carry during events. A lot of them also come with waterproof cases, so they are great for travelers. Price-wise, point-and-shoot cameras are the most affordable among the three camera types, so it's an excellent entry-level option if you're only starting to dabble into photography.

If you're a professional photographer or a serious hobbyist, you're no stranger to the wonders and capabilities of the mighty DSLR camera. From sweeping landscape photos to stunning portraits and detailed macro shots, DSLRs comes packed with features. Being able to shoot RAW images also opens a myriad of photo editing possibilities. But being a jack-of-all-trades comes with a downside: most DSLRs are heavy and bulky, often requiring dedicated bags or hard cases for transportation. DSLRs are also expensive, but their durability often makes up for the extra dollars you need to shell out.

The compact and stylish mirrorless cameras are becoming more and more popular. Sony and Fujifilm are churning out competitive devices in terms of specs and price, especially when compared to Canon and Nikon. Most mirrorless cameras are smaller than DSLRs, making it the camera of choice for travelers and journalists who need to produce high-quality photos on the go. If you're getting a mirrorless camera with interchangeable lenses, the possibilities of the shots you can take are almost endless. Some may think the mirrorless camera combines the best of the DSLR and point-and-shoot cameras: it's compact yet powerful, it's easy to use yet customizable for manual shooting, and its price is often somewhere between affordable and professional grade.

Intrepid adventurers would add action cameras to this list. With the advent of wearable cameras such as GoPro and handheld gimbal devices like DJI's Osmo Pocket, capturing every thrilling adventure is effortless. Some of these action cameras deliver stunning 4K videos and high definition images — in snow, underwater, or thousands of feet up in the air.

What to look for in a camera?

Now that you've chosen the type of camera you want based on your needs, it's time to get down to the nitty-gritty: camera specifications. Figuring them out on your own could get a bit intimidating, especially with all the jargon and numbers! But don't worry, we've listed down the five most important factors to check for when it comes to choosing the right camera model for you.

Image quality

For image quality alone, there are already several factors to consider, but we're narrowing it down to three things: sensor size, pixel count, and video quality.

Contrary to popular belief, a higher megapixel count doesn't always mean better performance. It all comes down to the sensor size. The sensor size determines how much light the camera can take to create an image. The bigger the sensor size, the more light the camera can absorb to come up with a brighter, crisper image. This leads us to the next factor: pixel count.

Canon defines pixel count as "the number of pixels contained in an image sensor, or that a captured photograph is made up of. The higher the number, the more information there is." Pixel count is measured in megapixels (MP). The average value for cameras nowadays is 16.6MP, so this is a reasonable basis when choosing a camera. If you need more detailed images, get a camera with a higher pixel count.

Factors like ISO sensitivity (the camera's ability to capture light) and the number of focus points (specific points used by the camera to focus on the subject) should also be considered to create an image with depth, focus, and even drama. ISO can go as high as 1,640,000, for example, for the Nikon D7500. A high light sensitivity makes it possible to capture rapidly moving objects — ideal for sports photography and photojournalism.

If you're into vlogging or filmmaking, you need a camera that can deliver high-definition videos. Today, the average video resolution is 1080p at 30fps. If you are looking for a camera with a stunning 4k video resolution, check out the Fujifilm X-T3 or the Panasonic Lumix GH5S.

Design & size

Now that we've got the basics of image quality covered, it's time to talk about the design. Sometimes, it's as simple as asking yourself: Will this camera fit in my favorite travel bag? or Will this be easy to carry while traveling?

The weight and the size of the camera should be taken into account in relation to your primary purpose. A bulky DSLR will do well on a tripod in a studio, a handy mirrorless camera would be great for a sightseeing trip, and a handheld pocket camera would be perfect for sports. You should also take into consideration whether you would benefit from a flip screen. The placement of buttons and eyepiece should feel comfortable on your fingertips and eyes.

Connectivity & ease of use

With today's fast-paced technology, even cameras need to be connected. Many cameras come equipped with built-in Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connection, enabling you to access your photos on our phone or laptop easily. Before purchasing a camera, it's also best to test its usability. Are the instructions, buttons, and menu easy to understand? If you're buying a camera with interchangeable lenses, is it easy to switch rapidly between different types of lenses?

Durability

All the factors and features discussed above would be useless if the camera is not durable. Its endurance will ensure that you'll get your money's worth. Depending on your purpose, ask yourself if you need a camera that's water-resistant and resilient to extreme weather.
The camera's battery life also comes into play here. How many shots can you take before you need to recharge it? A good number is at least 300 shots (depending on your memory card size).

Price

The last (and perhaps the most limiting) factor you need to consider when purchasing a camera is your budget. Always spring for the best camera that you can afford to get the most out of your money. Remember, buying a camera is an investment. It's up to you to make it a wise one.

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